The role of hypogonadism in Klinefelter Syndrome
Høst C, Skakkebæk A, Groth KA, Bojesen A. Asian J Androl. 2013 Dec 23. doi: 10.4103/1008-682X.122201. [Epub ahead of print]

The role of hypogonadism in Klinefelter Syndrome Høst C, Skakkebæk A, Groth KA, Bojesen A. Asian J Androl. 2013 Dec 23. doi: 10.4103/1008-682X.122201. [Epub ahead of print] Author information

Department of Clinical Genetics, Vejle Hospital, Vejle; Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Abstract

Klinefelter syndrome (KS) (47, XXY) is the most abundant sex-chromosome disorder, and is a common cause of infertility and hypogonadism in men. Most men with KS go through life without knowing the diagnosis, as only 25% are diagnosed and only a few of these before puberty. Apart from hypogonadism and azoospermia, most men with KS suffer from some degree of learning disability and may have various kinds of psychiatric problems. The effects of long-term hypogonadism may be diffi cult to discern from the gene dose effect of the extra X-chromosome. Whatever the cause, alterations in body composition, with more fat and less muscle mass and diminished bone mineral mass, as well as increased risk of metabolic consequences, such as type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome are all common in KS. These fi ndings should be a concern as they are not simply laboratory fi ndings; epidemiological studies in KS populations show an increased risk of both hospitalization and death from various diseases. Testosterone treatment should be offered to KS patients from early puberty, to secure a proper masculine development, nonetheless the evidence is weak or nonexisting, since no randomized controlled trials have ever been published. Here, we will review the current knowledge of hypogonadism in KS and the rationale for testosterone treatment and try to give our best recommendations for surveillance of this rather common, but often ignored, syndrome.