Effects of food intake on the pharmacokinetic properties of mirabegron oral controlled-absorption system: a single-dose, randomized, crossover study in healthy adults
Lee J, Zhang W, Moy S, Kowalski D, Kerbusch V, van Gelderen M, Sawamoto T, Grunenberg N, Keirns J. Clin Ther. 2013 Mar;35(3):333-41. doi: 10.1016/j.clinthera.2013.02.014.

Source

Astellas Pharma Global Development Inc, Northbrook, Illinois.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mirabegron is a β3-adrenoceptor agonist used for the treatment of overactive bladder. Mirabegron is formulated as an extended-release tablet using oral controlled-absorption system (OCAS) technology.

OBJECTIVE:

This study was designed to assess the effects of food on the pharmacokinetic properties of mirabegron OCAS in accordance with regulatory requirements to support dosing recommendations.

METHODS:

In this single-dose, randomized, open-label, 3-period, parallel-dose-group, crossover study, mirabegron OCAS 50 or 100 mg was administered orally to healthy adult subjects in the fasted state or after a high- or low-fat breakfast. Dose administrations were separated by a washout period of at least 10 days. Blood samples were drawn up to 96 hours after dosing, and plasma concentrations of mirabegron were analyzed by LC/MS-MS. PK properties were determined using noncompartmental methods. Primary end points for the assessment of food effects were Cmax and AUC0-∞. For tolerability assessment, adverse events (AEs) were monitored using investigators' questionnaires and subjects' spontaneous reports, vital sign measurements, hematology, clinical chemistry, and ECG.

RESULTS:

Thirty-eight subjects (male, 50%; mean age, 32.1 years; mean weight, 77.3 kg; race, 76.3% white) were enrolled in the 50-mg dose group and 38 subjects (male, 52.6%; mean age, 30.9 years; mean weight, 74.5 kg; race, 63.2% white) in the 100-mg dose group. With either fed condition or dose, the 90% CIs for the fed/fasted ratios of both Cmax and AUC0-∞ of mirabegron fell below the predetermined range for bioequivalence (80.0%-125.0%), suggesting that food had no effect on exposure to mirabegron OCAS. With the 50-mg dose, mirabegron Cmax was reduced by 45% with a high-fat breakfast compared with fasted conditions (geometric mean ratio [GMR], 54.8% [90% CI, 43.7%-68.6%]) and AUC0-∞, by 17% (GMR, 83.2% [90% CI, 74.2%-93.4%]). With the 100-mg dose, mirabegron Cmax and AUC0-∞ were reduced by 39% (GMR, 61.3% [90% CI, 47.8%-78.7%]) and 18% (82.4% [72.6%-93.5%]), respectively, after a high-fat breakfast. With the 50-mg dose, mirabegron Cmax was decreased by 75% (GMR, 25.0% [90% CI, 19.9%-31.3%]) and AUC0-∞ by 51% (48.7% [43.3%-54.7%]) after a low-fat breakfast. Corresponding reductions with the 100-mg dose were 64% (GMR, 36.3% [90% CI, 28.2%-46.8%]) for Cmax and 47% (GMR, 53.2% [90% CI, 46.8%-60.5%]) for AUC0-∞. The fed/fasted ratios for mirabegron Cmax and AUC0-∞ were in general independent of dose or sex. Food delayed Tmax compared with the fasted state, with similar increases with the high- and low-fat meals (0.9 hours with 50 mg and 1.5-2.0 hours with 100 mg). Mirabegron was generally well tolerated, with no apparent difference in AE frequency between the fasted and fed states.

CONCLUSIONS:

Mirabegron OCAS tablets exhibited a decrease in mirabegron plasma exposure with food that was independent of dose (50 or 100 mg) or gender but dependent on meal composition. A greater reduction in mirabegron exposure was observed after a low-fat breakfast compared with after a high-fat breakfast. Based on findings from previous studies, the effects of food observed in this study do not warrant dose adjustment in clinical practice. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00939757.