The safety and efficacy of aspirin intake in photoselective vaporization laser treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia
Shao IH, Hou CP, Chen SM, Chen CL, Lin YH, Chang PL, Tsui KH. Clin Interv Aging. 2013;8:265-9. doi: 10.2147/CIA.S41270. Epub 2013 Mar 9.

Source

Department of Urology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linko and Chang Gung University College of Medicine.

Abstract

Endoscopic surgical treatment has become an option to treat benign prostate hyperplasia. We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) in patients. We evaluated preoperative and perioperative parameters, functional outcomes, and adverse events up to 12 months postoperatively of patients on oral anticoagulation therapy undergoing PVP, and compared the results with patients who did not take anticoagulation therapy. A total of 89 patients who received photoselective vaporization laser for benign prostate hyperplasia from May 2006 to February 2011 in our hospital were enrolled in our study. The patients were divided into two groups based on whether or not they were taking oral aspirin; 23 (25.8%) patients were taking aspirin derivatives (aspirin group), and 66 (74.2%) were not taking aspirin derivatives (control group). The mean prostate volume (58.8 mL vs 51 mL; P = 0.16) and mean energy consumption (235,268 J vs 289,793 J; P = 0.097) were comparable between the aspirin group and control group. The average postoperative results of hemoglobin were 13.4 mg/ dL for the aspirin group versus 13.9 mg/dL for the control group (P = 0.327). A significantly higher maximum flow rates and 80% improved post-void residual urine were noted during the followup. Postoperatively all variable showed significant improvement starting at month 1 of followup and remained improved for the 12 month followup. Postoperative complications were low and comparable between groups. PVP was characterized by excellent hemostatic properties and a very low intraoperative complication rate, even in the patients who were taking aspirin. On the basis of our perioperative results, we recommend PVP as a safe and effective procedure for patients with symptomatic benign prostate hyperplasia when taking an aspirin derivative.